Tips for Teachers: are you ready for statutory RSHE?

Jan Lever, CEO, Jigsaw PSHE

With requirements for Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE) becoming compulsory from September 2020, many teachers will find themselves teaching this content as a mandatory part of the curriculum. This may not feel comfortable, it may feel outside the work they trained to do. These are specialist areas that young people want to learn and deserve to be taught well. So how do we find the time and expertise to do this?

High quality PSHE provision in school, which now includes RSHE, has been shown to have a positive effect on learner wellbeing during school and over the rest of their lives. Not only this, it has also been shown to have a positive effect on wider academic attainment.

Jan Lever is the creator and CEO of Jigsaw PSHE and has over 35 years’ of experience in education and 10 years’ experience as a counsellor and psychotherapist. We asked Jan for her top tips on how to start this important conversation.

The content included in the new RSHE framework supports effective communication, positive relationships and mental health, promoting healthy lifestyle choices, all of which will support young people – perhaps especially disadvantaged young people - to engage more fully with their education.

5 tips for successful RSHE:

  • Listen to young people so you start from where they are and address their needs.
  • Plan a well-structured whole-school programme to ensure progression.
  • Build a team of teachers who are keen and have the aptitude to deliver PSHE and provide ongoing training and high-quality resources.
  • Ensure an inclusive approach so all students and teachers feel respected, valuing difference and aligning to the Equality Duty.
  • Offer a qualification in RSHE to recognise learning and give status to this subject.

Start the conversation in your classroom with resources from Jigsaw PSHE, which are the perfect accompaniment alongside your delivery of the new Relationships, Sex and Health qualifications from NCFE. These qualifications have been developed to meet 100% of the guidance for RSHE from the government.

Stephen Mordue
Stephen Mordue
Exercise increases blood flow and levels of dopamine, a chemical which is released during all pleasurable activities, and a lack of it has been linked to depression.
Stephen Mordue
Stephen Mordue
When talking about nutrition I am not necessarily talking about weight loss. Instead, I am talking about the increasing evidence that good nutrition improves mood and mental well-being.
Stephen Mordue
Stephen Mordue
Being organised and methodical helps you control the chaos that is an inevitable part of life and helps you to remain calm in the face of challenges.
Stephen Mordue
Stephen Mordue
When it comes to self-care, research and data implies the most important element is sleep.
Matthew Burton
Matthew Burton
Matthew Burton is the head teacher at Thornhill Community Academy in Dewsbury and appeared on Channel 4’s Educating Yorkshire. Matthew has written for NCFE about making pivotal curriculum decisions on behalf of learners.
Rachel Hopkins
Rachel Hopkins
There are a whole host of reasons why you might encounter challenging students, and often, the reasons behind their behaviour aren’t entirely clear.
Stephen Mordue
Stephen Mordue
The effective management of stress has been high on the agenda in schools for over a decade and stress has been identified as the most common health and safety problem in the UK.
Danielle McCullough
Danielle McCullough
Schools across the country are using iAchieve to support the implementation and delivery of NCFE qualifications. The iAchieve online platform provides learners with an additional and alternative way of engaging with their NCFE qualification.
Danielle McCullough
Danielle McCullough
Abbey College Cambridge is using NCFE’s Accreditation Services to gain recognition and endorsement for their International Foundation Programmes (IFP).
Josh Dixon
Josh Dixon