The Importance of English Skills in Young People

With the recent Functional Skills reform, it's rare to go a day without hearing about maths and English within education sector news.

And following #InternationalLiteracyDay on 9 September, it seems a great opportunity to highlight the continued need for English skills in young people, not only now but in later life too.

International Literacy Day highlights the importance of literacy to individuals, communities and society, and we shouldn’t expect that to change in the future.

It’s argued that while technology is continuously shaping the future for those currently in education, skills in English will remain an important factor in life, education, or when entering the world of work. These skills will help those in education now adapt to the ever-changing landscape of the future.

Literacy skills are vital to allow individuals to engage successfully as citizens, as well as being fundamental to a learner’s progression in education. They aid their access to different routes in education and open up doors for their future, increasing learning outcomes and employability prospects.

Two of our recent blogs from June, The importance of English and maths in the skills system and English and maths are crucial to life and work. We need to build consensus for a higher ambition for young people and adults, highlight further the importance of English and Functional Skills for young learners.

NCFE’s commitment to creating a level playing field

Following recent GCSE results, it was reported by TES that more than 180,000 students missed out on grade 4 in English and maths.

At NCFE, we’ve been focusing on our #FullyFunctional campaign to create a level playing field for English and maths, including fair access to alternatives for young people, so learners have the option to take a qualification that is best suited to their learning strengths.

Fully Functional

Functional Skills reinforce skills in communication, problem solving, listening, time management and team working; transferable skills fundamental to everyday life, as well as learning.

Find out how our English and maths qualifications will ensure your learners have what they need to succeed.

Contact us today [email protected]

Stephen Mordue
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