Technical qualifications shown to have a positive impact on exclusions

Statistics in a recently published report from the Department for Education (DfE) have shown a positive correlation between learners who have studied a Technical Award and lower overall absence rates.

The report summarises some of the main findings including: “For pupils, and pupils on SEN support, in state-funded mainstream schools, taking a Technical Award is associated with pupils having lower absence rates, lower permanent exclusion rates and lower fixed exclusion rates, when compared to similar pupils who did not take a Technical Award.”

Digging down further into the statistics, the results are hugely encouraging for schools who include Technical Awards as part of their curriculum. Learners in mainstream schools who undertook a Technical Award were compared with a control group who were matched based on similar characteristics who did not undertake a technical qualification. In this instance, learners who did undertake a Technical qualification were shown to have a 15% lower absence rates overall.

The report also noted findings of a positive impact on long-term exclusion rates. Learners who undertook a Technical Award were shown to have 62% lower long-term exclusion rate than the control group. 

There were also positive results for the learners with SEN support in mainstream schools who undertook a Technical Award as they were shown to have 21% lower exclusion rates than the control group.

This information is particularly pertinent as it has been reported that exclusion rates are on the rise and with Pupil Referral Units (PRUs) struggling to meet the demand, mainstream schools need some evidence-based solutions to implement, to keep learners engaged.

This report shows that by considering Technical Awards as part of your curriculum planning, it could have a positive effect on your learners.

If you would like to discuss you curriculum planning for next year with one of our Qualification Advisors, you can book an appointment here.

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