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Message from Gillian Keegan, Minister for Apprenticeships and Skills

I’m delighted to share the news that the first T Level students are starting their courses this month and, judging from what I’ve seen and heard from speaking to providers students are already relishing the opportunities these new courses offer. I firmly believe having a T Level qualification under their belt will set these young people apart other qualifications and I want to ask you to help us celebrate the launch of T Levels across your networks.

T Levels represent the biggest reform to technical education in a generation. Having worked in industry, I understand the value T Levels bring to technical education, and the value that a qualification developed jointly with industry will bring businesses across the country. T Levels will provide employers with the skilled workforce they will need as our economy recovers and looks to the future.  It has never been more vital to ensure that young people gain the right knowledge and skills to make the most of their potential and to meet the needs of business.

I’d heard the buzz about T Levels before taking up this role back in February and knew they sounded like a really exciting development in post-GCSE education. I also thought they would be a great way for employers to recruit new talent and for young people to get ahead in their careers. The more I’ve heard about them – talking to students and providers at online open days and meetings with panel employers who designed them – the more convinced I’ve become. Now, as teaching starts for the first 3 T Levels in Digital, Education and Childcare, and Construction and Design, we have the task of helping to share the message

I firmly believe that these 2-year qualifications offer students a high-quality alternative to both A levels and apprenticeships. With the course content being specified by employers, we know students gain the best knowledge and practical skills together with a thorough grounding in their chosen career. This is then amplified by the innovative industry placement, where students spend around nine weeks working on real projects with an employer. Not only do they put their knowledge and skills to use they also become workplace-ready so that when they finish their course they’re ahead of others in terms of both skills and experience. While we expect many T Level graduates to go straight into an entry-level skilled role or higher or degree apprenticeship, T Levels also attract UCAS points so that if students want to go on to university or further study they will be able to.

I really am excited by the opportunities T Level offer to students, employers and to the future prosperity of this country and hope you will be too.

Stephen Mordue
Stephen Mordue
Just like in a car, first fear gets you going. In terms of self-care, first gear is our rest and recovery gear.
Case Study
Case Study
Priestley College is one of 33 pioneering pilot providers involved in the roll out of T Levels in Education and Childcare to the first cohort of students. Colleagues at the college talked to NCFE about their T Level success, and how they maintained access to vital industry placements for their students.
Case Study
Case Study
As we come to the end of the first teaching year of the T Level in Education and Childcare, we’re reflecting on the past few months to find out how students have found the experience so far. We spoke to Lexie, who is studying a T Level in Education and Childcare at Exeter College, about her first year of study.
Case Study
Case Study
The ‘Learner of the Year’ category in our Aspiration Awards honours learners who are developing themselves through vocational qualifications from NCFE, making positive improvements to their lives. This year’s winner was Katie Albert, who is currently studying the T Level in Education and Childcare at Blackpool and the Fylde College.
Craig Wade
Craig Wade
An introduction to Craig Wade, Health, Science and Social Care Sector Manager at NCFE