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A way to wellness with NCFE health and fitness qualifications

Amy achieved her dream of becoming a PT by studying NCFE qualifications in health and fitness. Amy now helps women achieve their own individual fitness goals through one to one training sessions at her North East home.

We spoke to Amy about how the NCFE qualifications helped her to start up her own business, AW² Wellness.

What made you decide to become a PT and study NCFE qualifications?

I was very overweight for a long time and lost 6.5 stone through a slimming group. This led to me developing an eating disorder and really struggling with my own health and fitness. I over-exercised and under-ate for fear of gaining weight. After a year travelling, I decided to start working with a PT who really helped me to understand the importance of good nutrition, gain control and flexibility with my diet and introduced me to strength training, which I loved.

Over time I found I felt most confident, controlled and energised when engaging in anything health fitness related - whether that was learning new recipes or exercises, looking up new gym routines, or just talking to people generally about lifestyle. I then decided to start studying NCFE fitness qualifications. I studied the Level 2 Certificate in Fitness Instructing (Gym-Based Exercise) and the Level 3 Certificate in Personal Training.

What did you enjoy most about studying NCFE qualifications, and what skills did you gain?

The flexibility of the distance learning qualification really appealed to me as it meant I could keep working and earning while working towards my qualification.

The NCFE qualifications allowed me to become a PT by gaining the necessary knowledge and skills for working in the fitness industry and this has helped me start my business and develop effective exercise programmes for my clients.

Would you recommend the qualification to other learners?

100% - the flexibility is great and there was always someone at the other end of the phone to answer any questions I had.

What are the good things about your job and what are the challenges?

Generally, PTs are very supportive of other PTs, which means you always have someone to turn to for device and support. However, the industry is saturated with people who don’t have qualifications but think ‘they know best’ as they have been training (not always correctly!) for years, so they think that they can give better advice through social media platforms without any qualifications.

I would recommend to people who want to enter the industry to study NCFE qualifications, as this helps you gain the skills and knowledge required to build a successful career in health and fitness. Even if you’ve been training for a long time, it’s essential to also have the technical knowledge to prevent injuries and accidents.  

What is the most rewarding thing about your role?

The most rewarding thing is the impact I have on people’s lives. For me, it’s all about mental health. It’s more important to be able to elevate someone’s mood, improve their self-confidence and self-worth, and make them feel happier, healthier and more comfortable in their bodies, rather than just see a change in the number on the scales. I am lucky enough to get to see this positivity in my clients every day!

Do you have any advice for young people entering the sector?

You need to be passionate and resilient. If money is your main motivation, then you’re going to struggle. It’s a tough industry and you can’t expect your clients to have the same goals, time or motivation you have - remember you’re working to help them on their journey not trying to get them to mirror your own. Just make sure you love what you’re doing - I’m lucky that I do!

To find out more about NCFE qualifications in Health and Fitness, visit our QualHub website.

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